4.5 Reasons to Hire a Crazy Employee

4.5 Reasons to Hire a Crazy Employee

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Those of us who run companies are constantly looking for ways to increase revenue, profits, and improve efficiency. The people we hire play a significant role in how we run our businesses and the results that we get. Unfortunately most of the time, we stick to the same old hiring routines and decisions of the past.

crazy employee

If you’ve managed your business effectively by following all the traditional rules for finding quality employees and have “played it safe,” you’ve probably experienced moderate performance. But most of us want more than that. It’s time to look for ways to drive your company to the next level.

The single best thing I’ve done to strengthen my client companies is to help them recruit exceptional talent. I encourage them to strive to find unique, special, unorthodox candidates – or even a “crazy employee”. A person who is crazy about the industry, not mentally ill, could be exactly what you need. Here are 4.5 (yes, 4 and a half!) ways a creative brain can help your company.

1. A crazy employee brings in new energy.

Hiring a crazy person is the best way to amp-up energy in a tired team. In my experience, I’ve found the best solution for an environment that has become too comfortable or boring is to hire an individual with an unorthodox approach to problems.

It’s important to use different hiring techniques to help find people like this. I especially like using hands-on problem-solving scenarios in my interview process to discover the best potential team members.

2. A crazy employee breaks up the “usual” company patterns.

Having a crazy person join a work group helps break up the typical routine. If you can finish each other’s sentences or anticipate what your colleagues will say at a meeting, it may be time to add someone new. Injecting an “outside” voice to the conversation will help your team think beyond the “usual” solutions.

3. A crazy employee fosters creativity.

Next, a crazy person brings a boost of creativity. You want to find someone who has original ideas for new products or services. Crazy people will not only provide innovative ideas but they will likely inspire your existing employees. The entire team can then begin to generate more creative thoughts together.

4. A crazy person helps you avoid employing an “army of clones.”

It’s also important to get some new “blood” flowing into your company to avoid having an “army of clones” working for you. For some reason, many business owners tend to seek out people who are like themselves. As appealing as that sounds, it may not be the best long-term plan for going beyond a moderate level of success and thinking of new directions for your company.

I distinctly remember a movie called Garden of Stones. James Caan and James Earl Jones are salty, mature US Army Master Sergeants. There is a bar scene in the movie where they utter a toast…”here’s to us and those just like us”. I caution you to not let this type of thinking permeate your culture.

4.5. A crazy person will shake up the status quo.

The last reason you should consider hiring someone unique is to shake up the status quo. Change is scary, I know. Be that as it may, it’s important to take risks and have courage. The most successful companies of our time (like Apple, Amazon, Ford, and others) know this. It can pay off for you if you make the right choices.

The people who work for you are clearly your most valuable business resource. It’s vital to seek brilliant creative ideas and innovation. The best way to do this is to find that special, eclectic thinking crazy person who can inspire the rest of your team to do their best work.

If you need help hiring more crazy employees, contact your future business coach by filling out my contact form.

Dave Schoenbeck

Dave Schoenbeck

Dave Schoenbeck is a professional business and executive coach who translates complex business methods, processes, and strategies into actionable plans to dramatically improve financial results.
Dave Schoenbeck
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